The Relevance Of Bhagavad Gita In The Modern World
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The Relevance Of Bhagavad Gita In The Modern World

The Bhagavad Gita is a part of the epic poem Mahabharat written by Shri Ved Vyasa. Bhagavad Gita is a dialogue between Arjun and Shri Krishna that had taken place on the battlegrounds just before the Mahabharat war begins. When Arjun (third of the Pandavs) was distraught at the prospects of fighting a war with his own relatives, Shri Krishna explains the facts of life that we know as Shrimad Bhagavad Gita. Shrimad Bhagavad Gita is the essence of the Vedas, including the Upanishads.

The Relevance Of The Bhagavad Gita In The Modern World

Shrimad Bhagavad Gita is considered a timeless text. It is as applicable now as it was 5000 years ago. As opposed to the Christian Bible or the Muslim’s Qoran, Shrimad Bhagavad Gita is directly spoken by God for his devotees.

It is said that you will find all your answers in Gita, whatever your questions. Is that right? As a modern cognitive person, you are always programmed to ask a question before accepting anything. So here are just some of the reasons that make Gita relevant today:

The Analogy

None of us has to go to war in this era; however, we are destined to fight our inner demons alone. If we compare the factors of the Bhagavad Gita with our battles today, we can apply the whole Gita to our lives. Let’s see what I mean:

  • Arjun: Arjun is our mind that is confused whether to follow spiritualism or materialism; whether the world with its dazzling lights is actual or the world with an inner light; whether the samskars given by the parents are the accurate way of life or they obsolete?
  • Shri Krishna: He remains a constant here, guiding his disciples regardless of the yuga.
  • Chariot: The chariot of the Arjun represents our physical body.
  • Five horses: The five horses represent the five senses our body operates with. (The chariot is driven by the horses).
  • The Pandavs: Our Sanskars or our goodness meant to take us on the right path.
  • The Kauravs: The material world luring us to the bad karmas from a hundred different angles.

Arjun (you and I) has a million questions about what’s right and wrong. Shri Krishna explains to him the fundamentals of life, karma, death, and rebirth, among other things. He describes what his duties as a kshyatriya, a warrior are. At the end of the day, the decision to fight the war rests on Arjun’s shoulders. Shri Krishna is a true Sarathi (Charioteer) who does not choose the route but lets Arjun take that decision.

What Will You Find In Gita:

You will probably find the answers to the following questions in Gita:

  • “Should I cheat in online exams to gain more marks for the happiness of my parents?”
  • “Should I work and forget about rewards? Does that mean I should not expect any returns for my hard work? Not even a promotion?”
  • “What comes first the time that I spend with my family or the time I spend earning for them? Isn’t my duty to give them the best life?”
  • “What difference does it make if I don’t cook? There are a thousand restaurants in the city. How is my food better than them?”
  • “If my mother does not get along with my wife, shouldn’t she adjust?”
  • “What is wrong with playing violent video games? Why is mom controlling my life so much? It is not that I am really killing someone.”
  • “As a doctor, I studied for years before I could start earning. Pandemic is a time when I can mint money. They need me now. What is wrong if I charge more?”

In the modern world, we all face choices that confuse us as Arjun. If we read Shrimad Bhagavad Gita, we will NOT find our answers, but we will find the right path that leads to the solutions. Gita does not make choices for you but merely states what kind of choices are correct. The burden of making the choices and following the right path rests on your shoulders alone. Gita teaches you to perform karma to fulfill your dharma to achieve moksh.

Final Words

A verse from Shrimad Bhagavad Gita to sum up:

कर्मण्येवाधिकारस्ते मा फलेषु कदाचन।

मा कर्मफलहेतुर्भूर्मा ते सङ्गोऽस्त्वकर्मणि॥ २-४७

You have the right to your work alone and not to the fruits. Do not be driven by the fruits of labor.

Nor have an attachment to inaction.

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